Planet MULE — Simulation Game Evaluation

Planet_MULE_670b

We have been evaluating simulation games. Planet M.U.L.E. is a modern re-write of a classic four-player land settlement game, engineered for network play. 

Learning Curve: 1 hour.
Suitability for a policy context: limited

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Kudos 2 Simulation Game — Simulation Game Evaluation

We have been evaluating policy simulation games, both for design ideas, and for a sense of whether they might be useful for real world policy processes. Kudos 2 allows the player to play out the life of of a twenty-something from the ages of 20–30. The modding facilities in Kudos 2 should allow, with weeks to months of development time, playing out the life of someone with a particular challenge (e.g., blindness), set of circumstances (e.g., foster-parenthood), or life-goal (e.g., socially-relevant employment).

Game learning Curve: 10–20 mins.
Development Curve (to modify for specialized applications): weeks to months.

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SimCity — Policy Simulation Game Evaluation

SimCityGreenCityExample
Example of a green city built in SimCity

We have been evaluating policy simulation games, both for design ideas, and for a sense of whether they might be useful for real world policy processes. SimCity, as you might imagine from the title, allows the player to build and run a city. The player has considerably more freedom than might be available to a municipal politician, leading to a certain lack of realism. This article discusses the 2013 version of SimCity, with the GlassBox simulation engine. 

Learning Curve: 10–30 mins

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